Celebrate

At Ancaster Mill we love to celebrate the holiday season. This December our menu is focused on Ciancone family tradition, fond memories and personal favourites from our team. We hope that by featuring clementines, gingerbread, candied pecans, sweet potatoes, apple cider and roasted pears - we will find an ingredient or memory that makes you think of being home for the holidays.


Here's a peek at some of the dinner entrées we'll be featuring...

Chestnut Tortellini
salt-baked celeriac, maple smoked Comfort Cream, apple cider reduction

Chassagne Farm Pheasant
roasted breast, braised leg, butter-roasted pear, braised red cabbage, candied sweet potato

Roasted Breast & Confit Leg of Duck
clementine glaze, braised Japanese radish, spiced bread pudding, candied ginger jus

Our full menu can be found here.


Wreath
Fire
Apples


Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire...

Why has roasting chestnuts become synonymous with Christmas time? This tradition dates back for centuries, which means many different stories and origins are floating around. One thing is certain, that roasting sweetens the nut’s flavour, making it a perfect snack to consume around the holidays when we tend to indulge a little more than usual. If it makes you feel better, chestnuts are packed with nutrients!


What is a Pheasant?

A pheasant is a large long-tailed game bird. The males tend to be highly ornate, featuring bright colours and showy plumage. The pheasant is one of the world’s most hunted birds. The pheasant season in Ontario usually occurs from the middle of October until the middle of December.


Cranberries, Cranberries, Cranberries.

Cranberries are everywhere around the holiday season. And not just to eat, they are commonly used in holiday decor. Cranberries grow on dense ground cover on vines (not in water). During harvest in the fall, the bogs are flooded to facilitate picking. Cranberries are one of the few fruits native to North America. In fact, cranberries were eaten by aboriginal people before the Europeans arrived. They ate them raw, but also boiled them, sweetened with maple syrup, and added them to native dishes.